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On Air: Dr. Brian Paris Shares Dangers of Sitting

“Sitting is the new smoking,” Dr. Brian Paris tells News Channel 8’s Larry Smith on Good Morning Washington. A sedentary lifestyle causes a host of problems which include digestive issues, diabetes and obesity. Sitting too much is even linked with an increased likelihood of developing cancer. It may seem like an unavoidable challenge for people whose jobs involve sitting at a desk all day, but Dr. Paris shares how easy it is to overcome a sedentary lifestyle.

The first recommendation Dr. Paris makes is for a wobble chair that allows your whole body to move around while your feet stay firmly planted on the ground. This allows you to exercise your back, legs and abdominal area. Larry Smith even takes a seat, demonstrating the wobble chair himself. Another useful tool is a regular desk that has the ability to transform into a standing desk, so you can switch between sitting and standing.

To avoid sitting too much without buying new equipment, Dr. Paris discloses his personal strategy for making a sedentary routine active. Dr. Paris suggests that for every 25 minutes of time spent working, five minutes should be spent moving around. It can be as simple as getting a drink of water or stretching right at the side of your desk.

 

On Air: RPT™ Strikes Again, Literally

Slapping pain away might sound contradictory, but Reflexive Pattern Therapy™ is a treatment that does just that. On Good Morning Washington, NewsChannel 8 reporter Eileen Whelan takes a closer look at the one-of-a-kind treatment with RPT™ creator Andrew Bloch, who uses gentle slapping, smacking and prodding to relieve chronic pain.

Whelan describes RPT™ as “a breakthrough treatment for pain” and watches as Andrew treats one of his clients, former NCAA basketball player Jon Larranaga. Before meeting Bloch and discovering RPT™, Larranaga suffered from chronic hip pain for a dozen years. Larranaga tells Whelan that “after seeing Andy for really the first treatment, the pain went away.” He goes on to describe RPT™ saying, “It looks weird, it sounds weird, but it works.”

Bloch tells Whelan about how the unusual treatment works and makes such a big difference. Bloch says “I discovered these involuntary pain patterns in the body, and once I treat them I kind of reset the neurological system, almost like a computer or phone. Once you reset that, the pain is relieved almost immediately.” Essentially, RPT™ is a fascinating solution for anyone who wants pain relief to be as easy as pressing a button. Of course, pressing that button might mean taking a little bit of light smacking.

On air, Whelan is so intrigued by RPT™ ,that she decides to test it out herself. After experiencing the full RPT™ treatment, Whelan is shocked by how well it works. Watch the video below:

GMW: Dr. Brian Paris’s Ways to Prevent Vacation Injury

Summer vacation is a time for relaxation and rejuvenation, but millions of Americans suffer from or worsen neck and back pain while having fun in the sun. Dr. Brian Paris of Advanced Wellness Systems sits down with anchor Autria Godfrey to discuss the surge in summertime injuries and tips for preventing vacation injury on NewsChannel 8’s Good Morning Washington.

Without fail, Dr. Paris sees an uptick in visits from patients who come back from trips in pain every summer. He attributes the increase in seasonal injuries to people going on vacation and doing what they don’t normally do, whether it be participating in extreme sports, a poor diet, heavy lifting or extended periods of sitting.

In the video above, Dr. Paris shares some tips to help your next summer getaway safely and smoothly:

  1. When traveling by car, sit upright in the driver’s seat with your hands at 4 o’clock and 8 o’clock.

  2. Get up and move every two to three hours during long car and plane rides.

  3. Pack lighter to lessen the strain on your back and joints.

  4. When lifting luggage, use your legs and knees instead of back.

  5. Stay hydrated to keep your muscles from stiffening.

  6. Prepare your body for extreme recreation such as rock climbing and kayaking.

  7. “Work in” instead of workout by focusing on activities that rest and recharge the body–reading, walking and yoga.

For more summer travel wellness tips, click here.

 

GMW: Dr. Brian Paris Warns of the Dangers of Texting

Text Neck Epidemic

Mobile devices can literally become a pain in the neck. Constant texting, typing and tweeting can lead to “text neck,” and Dr. Brian Paris of Advanced Wellness Systems joins Good Morning Washington to shed light on the text neck epidemic and share tips for improving posture.

On air, Dr. Paris illustrates how long periods of technology use leaves users, particularly children, hunched over in a forward flex position. This poor posture places unnecessary pressure and stress on the neck, shoulders and spine. Not only does “text neck” impact one’s musculoskeletal system, poor posture negatively affects one’s emotional state and body language.

To combat the effects of “text neck,” Dr. Paris recommends using technology in 10-minute intervals and taking a 10-second break to get into correct posture:

  1. Get up.
  2. Grip the floor with your feet.
  3. Pull your belly button into your spine.
  4. Let your hands down.
  5. Stand up tall.

Watch Dr. Paris discuss the “text neck” epidemic on NewsChannel 8 above.

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