55 Foods for Arthritis and Joint Health

Millions of American suffer from arthritis. 52.5 million to be exact. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports arthritis, characterized by inflammation and loss of function in parts of the body, is a public health problem. The numbers are alarming:

  • The number of adults with arthritis is expected to increase to 67 million by 2030.
  • Although arthritis is most prevalent among adults aged 65 and older, nearly two-thirds of people with the condition are younger than 65.
  • Arthritis is the nation’s most common cause of disability and limits the activities of 22.7 million Americans.
  • Nearly half of American adults suffering from arthritis have at least one other chronic disease or condition such as heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure or obesity.

Diet plays a major role in joint health, and the right foods and nutrients can minimize inflammation and make managing arthritis easier.

In general, a joint-friendly diet should include fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts, legumes and healthy oils. Look for foods rich in Omega-3 and other heart-healthy fats, and Vitamins C, D and K. Limit or avoid red meat, daily, saturated fat and sugars, which all cause increases in inflammation and pain.

The next time you head to the grocery store, take our list of 55 Arthritis-fighting foods foods.

Printable Version

Vegetables

  1. Bell Pepper
  2. Bok Choy
  3. Broccoli
  4. Cauliflower
  5. Celery
  6. Collard Greens
  7. Egg Plant
  8. Garlic
  9. Ginger
  10. Kale
  11. Leeks
  12. Onion
  13. Shallot
  14. Spinach
  15. Squash
  16. Sweet Potato

Fruits

  1. Avocado
  2. Apricot
  3. Blackberries
  4. Blueberries
  5. Cherries
  6. Grapefruit
  7. Grapes
  8. Lime
  9. Mango
  10. Orange
  11. Papaya
  12. Pineapple
  13. Raspberries
  14. Strawberries
  15. Tangerine

Protein

  1. Edamame
  2. Herring
  3. Kidney Beans
  4. Mackerel
  5. Pinto Beans
  6. Salmon
  7. Sardines
  8. Soybeans
  9. Tofu
  10. Trout
  11. Tuna

Nuts & Seeds

  1. Almonds
  2. Flaxseeds
  3. Pine Nuts
  4. Pistachios
  5. Walnuts

Grains

  1. Brown Rice
  2. Oatmeal

Healthy Oils

  1. Avocado Oil
  2. Olive Oil
  3. Safflower Oil

Liquids

  1. Almond Milk
  2. Green Tea
  3. Water

Download and print our joint-friendly foods list here.

ABC 7: Using Physical Therapy to Cope with Chronic Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease is on the rise, putting health officials on high alert. The infectious disease is transmitted to humans through the bite of a tiny deer tick. It starts off as a bulls-eye rash for some, but other early symptoms include fever, headache, and tiredness, The scariest symptom however, is that the disease often goes undiagnosed.

This was the case for Kathy Fowler Silverstein, who suffered from the frightening disease for 15 years before finally being properly diagnosed in 2006. She was featured on ABC 7 News to discuss her terrible experience with the debilitating disease. At her worst moments, Kathy felt “extremely fatigued, couldn’t get out of bed, couldn’t think” and at times “couldn’t even remember things.”

Now, she manages her illness by receiving physical therapy twice a week from Dr. Brian Paris of Advanced Wellness Systems. The physical therapy from Dr. Paris, combined with eating well and keeping stress-free, has Kathy living a relatively healthy life again.

Every year, about 300,000 cases of Lyme Disease are reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Maryland saw an increase in reported cases from 801 in 2013 to 1,373 in 2014, while Virginia saw a similar rise from 925 to 1,346 cases.

While the reasons for the recent spike in reported Lyme disease cases are relatively unknown, some experts think warmer temperatures are improving tick survival. Others believe that improved awareness has led to more diagnoses.

If you find a tick on your body, save it in a bag or container so that it can be tested for Lyme disease. The tests to see if the tick has the disease are much more accurate than the tests to see if the disease has been transmitted to you.

RPT™: Conquering the CrossFit Games

Their dreams were about to be shattered. After months, if not years, of grueling training, 12 Labours CrossFit Columbia had finally made it to the 2015 Atlantic Regionals. The competition involves incredible feats of physical prowess–looking to find, as they say, the Fittest on Earth. But not long after the games got going in Atlanta, 12 Labours team member Teresa Luz threw out her back, and could hardly stand. Worse, the rules prohibit a substitution.

Fortunately, another team member was able to step in. No, Jimmy Violand couldn’t compete, but he could treat Teresa with Reflexive Pattern Therapy™. Jimmy is a physical therapy assistant at Advanced Wellness Systems in Rockville and Columbia, where RPT™ was developed. New to many, RPT™ is a pain relief treatment that uses reflexes as a tool to correct patterns in the autonomous nervous system. The technique delivers fast, pressurized contact movements to problem areas, evoking a reflex that provides immediate pain relief.

Thinking fast, Jimmy got RPT™ creator Andrew Bloch on Skype, and together the two treated Teresa. In just one forty-five minute session of RPT™, Teresa’s mobility improved by 60-70% and with continued treatment, her back pain disappeared altogether. Teresa was back in the games, and her improvement showed. 12 Labours crushed their competition in the last few events and the team’s efforts landed them a coveted spot to compete in the World Games in California.

Support 12 Labours by donating on their Go Fund Me page.

GMW: Dr. Brian Paris Warns of the Dangers of Texting

Text Neck Epidemic

Mobile devices can literally become a pain in the neck. Constant texting, typing and tweeting can lead to “text neck,” and Dr. Brian Paris of Advanced Wellness Systems joins Good Morning Washington to shed light on the text neck epidemic and share tips for improving posture.

On air, Dr. Paris illustrates how long periods of technology use leaves users, particularly children, hunched over in a forward flex position. This poor posture places unnecessary pressure and stress on the neck, shoulders and spine. Not only does “text neck” impact one’s musculoskeletal system, poor posture negatively affects one’s emotional state and body language.

To combat the effects of “text neck,” Dr. Paris recommends using technology in 10-minute intervals and taking a 10-second break to get into correct posture:

  1. Get up.
  2. Grip the floor with your feet.
  3. Pull your belly button into your spine.
  4. Let your hands down.
  5. Stand up tall.

Watch Dr. Paris discuss the “text neck” epidemic on NewsChannel 8 above.

WAVA’s Rich Lee and Dr. Brian Paris Beat Knee Pain

WAVA Radio’s Rich Lee beat knee pain thanks to the incredible I HATE KNEE PAIN treatment. The popular morning show host, who also happens to be one of I Hate Knee Pain’s newest patients, is on air with Dr. Brian Paris talking about what he calls his “new knees.” They were achieved without painful surgery or addictive drugs.

“I truly believe this is a great opportunity for anyone who has knee pain,” says Lee, who has been living pain free since his first visit to Advanced Wellness Systems. On air, Dr. Paris  breaks down I Hate Knee Pain’s breakthrough approach.

After seeing a tremendous amount of failure in traditional treatments such as cortisone shots and surgery, Dr. Paris combined viscosupplementation, customized physical training and lifestyle changes. During viscosupplementation, a natural substance your knee already produces is injected into the joint and provides relief instantly. Once the pain is treated, training builds strength, mobility and stability in the knees.

In the video above, Lee celebrates his “graduation” from I Hate Knee Pain. It’s a commencement indeed, marked by the beginning of walking, squatting and enjoying life without knee pain. He’s even made himself available to be the Redskins’ new kicker. The possibilities are endless with “new knees.”

If you suffer from debilitating knee pain, please visit www.ihatekneepain.com or call 301-761-5958 today. Doctors orders.