No Sleep? Big Problem.

Everyone needs sleep, as it’s just as important to your survival as food and water. But according to the National Sleep Foundation, few Americans are able to get the necessary amount of sleep.

People can be so busy that sleeping doesn’t even make it on their list of priorities. But whether you’re a college student, new mom or anything in between, getting enough sleep will make you a better you.

Sleep deprivation has a myriad of negative effects. It causes moodiness and sleepiness. Feeling sleepy during your day can lead to less productivity, because your attention, concentration and problem-solving skills are impaired. A lack of sleep also causes major health problems including weight gain, diabetes, heart disease, depression, high blood pressure, an overall weakened immune system and increased mortality.

Sleep needs depend on both a person’s lifestyle and health, so it’s important to figure out what factors are affecting your sleep when determining the amount of sleep necessary for you to function well. But for added help, just this year the National Sleep Foundation released an updated version of their recommended hours of sleep for every age group:

  • Newborns (0-3 months ): 14-17 hours each day
  • Infants (4-11 months): 12-15 hours each day
  • Toddlers (1-2 years): 11-14 hours each day
  • Preschoolers (3-5): 10-13 hours each day
  • School age children (6-13): 9-11 hours each day
  • Teenagers (14-17): 8-10 hours each day
  • Younger adults (18-25): 7-9 hours each day
  • Adults (26-64): 7-9 hours each day
  • Older adults (65+): 7-8 hours each day

Good night!

WNEW Radio: Prevent Injuries When Shoveling Snow

Get your shovels ready–more snow is on the way. While you may consider shoveling snow to be a chore, Dr. Brian Paris, owner and chiropractor of Advanced Wellness Systems in Rockville, MD, says you should regard it as a physical sport. Shoveling snow is an intense activity that could cause injuries if you don’t do it right.

To prevent injuries, Dr. Paris advises you to:

Warm Up: Do a few squat exercises and push ups before you start. The squats can be in and out of a chair, if the regular variety are too difficult. Push-ups can be on the floor, or if you prefer, against the wall. Once outside, do some lunges to start sweating before you shovel.

Hydrate: Drink plenty of water

Use Correct Form: The proper foot placement can prevent injury. Try a split stance by placing your left foot in front of the other, with your hands associated properly on the shovel. Then switch and put the other foot forward. The same goes for you hands. Switching your footing and your hand placement assures you’re not always twisting and throwing the snow in the same direction. An ergonomic shovel can also be a big help.

If you’ve been out shoveling snow and you feel like you might have pulled a muscle, Dr. Paris recommends you:

Stop Immediately: If you feel you’re in pain, take some time to rest.

Treat Your Injury: Depending on what feels better, use either a hot or cold compress for the pain.

But another way to avoid an injury, is just to pay a neighborhood kid to shovel. Dr. Paris got his start in business by shoveling snow as a teen, and thinks it’s is a much better deal to pay than to put yourself at risk. Plus, it helps entrepreneurship.

For more information, listen to Dr. Paris on WNEW radio above.

 

Everything You Need to Know about Migraines

Migraines top the list of complaints to doctors. The debilitating pain goes beyond the physical. It impacts sufferers’ careers and relationships. Here is everything you need to know about migraines.

Visit HeadachesGoAway.com to start your journey towards relief.

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